Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

Discussion in 'General TV & Media' started by SunsetBoulevard, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. starzsgirl

    starzsgirl Captain

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    Neither side is going to be happy until they have reached all of the intended goals. Needless to say that each will continue to do this until they have exchausted every angle. And what's worse is the other workers and the fans are the ones stuck in the middle of it all.
     
  2. adorelo

    adorelo CSI Level Two

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    Do these people not understand it's about compromise? Both can't get exactly what they want.

    Thanks for the links, by the way :D
     
  3. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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    Actually the fact that they are getting all this information together first is a good sign, sounds like they are looking at what if asked could be tabled and what couldn't, the best route in which to approach things, and basically just make sure they have their ducks in a row, giving a time frame to gather it, then setting the time frame to have the talks, allowing for possible break downs and or breaks and returns to the table, before they would hit the deadline. Now they said that they were not ruling out a stike, but it sounds to be that they would preferre to avoid it if possible.

    Now this bodes well for the otherside of the table as much as for the SAG side of it. I too hope that both sides go in with the knowledge learned from the writers strike and the deal made with the directors. And also from the sounds of it the actors (at least some) are already saying find away to make this work.

    As to the links, your welcome. :)
     
  4. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    Variety has this article: AFTRA puts SAG on clock - Letter sent to Actors presses for March talks. <SNIP> "AFTRA is turning up the pressure on the Screen Actors Guild to get to the negotiating table by the end of this month -- or watch AFTRA start bargaining on its own."
     
  5. LibertyBell

    LibertyBell Police Officer

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    Well I think that's a great idea on AFTRA's part. From what I can tell the SAG are still dragging their heels, and honestly, if they think they're going to get the same amount of sympathy as the WGA did, they are sorely mistaken. Everyone got fed up with the writers strike towards the end, and seeing the consequences of it, even if the people involved are blind to it/don't care about it. The fans and people in surrounding businesses aren't gonna be so gung-ho about a strike this time. Get your act together, SAG, you can't afford to lose support if you have any chance of getting what you want in these negotiations.
     
  6. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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  7. Jacquie

    Jacquie Ward Girl Moderator

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    It appears that SAG and AFTRA will be going their own ways in negotiations for the up and coming talks with producers. After a 27 year relationship the two sides have decided to go their separate ways.

    TV, film actors sever ties

    I don't know if this is good news or bad news for the TV shows we watch as I don't know which union the actors belong to.
     
  8. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    I don't know if this will help these link are to Memo's on the websites of those in all this. I also included for those wondering what each outfit is about.

    What is AFTRA
    AFTRA and SAG Representatives Present Contract Proposal Package to Unions’ Joint Board on Saturday, March 29
    AFTRA Suspends Joint Bargaining with SAG to Negotiate Primetime TV Contract on its Own.
    AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM NATIONAL PRESIDENT ROBERTA REARDON

    About SAG
    03-27: SAG AND AFTRA REPRESENTATIVES TO PRESENT CONTRACT PROPOSAL PACKAGE
    03-29: SAG RESPONDS TO AFTRA’S TERMINATION OF PHASE ONE AGREEMENT

    About AMPTP
    Breaking News From AMPTP
    March 29, 2008, On February 14th, just after we concluded our agreement with the writers, we called for our negotiations with actors to begin promptly. Today we are pleased to learn that AFTRA is also ready to begin talks immediately. We are determined, as we have always been, to work hard and bargain reasonably with the actors’ unions so that we can all avoid another harmful, unnecessary strike.

    Well at least someone is ready to talk to say the least, I don't know what happened from the sounds of it AFTRA and SAG were all set to get down to business but something (apparently were not being told) happened to cause AFTRA to stop it all and separate from SAG. I hope that everyone listens to its members when they say We don't want a strike, so work it out. - "Though the actors' three-year contract doesn't expire until June 30, SAG has been under pressure from prominent members such as George Clooney and Tom Hanks to begin talks with the studios immediately in order to avoid a potential strike that would shut down all movie and TV production." or as stated on the Yahoo news article posted above, "producers and several A-list actors including Tom Hanks, George Clooney, Meryl Streep and Robert De Niro had been pressing for negotiations to start as early as this week."

    Hopefully this link still works for folks its the Yahoo News Search on the subject. I did find this interesting in that search, and maybe Hopeful.

    Unions representing film and television actors will negotiate separately March 30, 2008.

    There are times when I wonder if SAG is what at one time someone coined them "Strike Happy", this is just my opinion and while I understand you have to fight for your members, but when your members are basically saying make a deal we don't want to strike, I would say that says alot again in my opinion. I don't know for fact who is at fault in all this but I do know that alot of actors/actresses and fans are not going to be happy if an agreement can not be made before the dead line. And it has me wondering whether or not the actress will go out on a picket line or whether they will stand back and say "hey you got us into this mess, get us out of it".
     
  9. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    Okay I am suppost to have 24 hrs to edit and from the time frame I should still have time, but its not showing that, sooo here is todays news on it.

    Soap drama fuels Hollywood labor woes
    Actors unions butt heads over negotiations

    LOL They tend to call celebs primadonnas but these unions need to grow up and get on with business instead of the he said, she said crap they are pulling, this is just my opinion.

    As to the question that was asked on who represents who, from what I understand AFTRA represents daytime stars, music, radio, ect. While SAG represents the primetime tv. As for movies thats a bit confusing to me as some seem to be represented by SAG and a couple with AFTRA (maybe because they have Multiple boundries in entertainment).
     
  10. LibertyBell

    LibertyBell Police Officer

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    I completely agree, Destiny. These union members are just getting ridiculous. Part of the reason I hate unions is they abuse their power like this. They say they're all about fighting for the little guy and getting what's fair, but then they refuse to be reasonable, like start negotiations ASAP and then they wonder why the other side won't give into their demands. And then they strike and that winds up hurting a bunch of people that aren't involved at all, which just makes them look like hypocrites.:devil:

    Of course there's still a chance they could negotiate and reach a deal, right? It might be naive but I'm gonna keep my fingers crossed.
     
  11. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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  12. Destiny

    Destiny Still Sanity Challenged! Premium Member

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  13. vegaslights

    vegaslights Brute

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    Q&A with Screen Actors Guild head Alan Rosenberg
    Wed May 7, 2008 7:20pm EDT
    By Steve Gorman

    LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Screen Actors Guild President Alan Rosenberg was elected as head of the nation's largest performers' union in 2005 on a pledge to take a tougher stance in labor talks than his immediate predecessor.

    He played a crucial role in rallying actors to support writers who went on strike for 14 weeks until February, bringing much of television production to a standstill and derailing numerous films.

    Now he is presiding over SAG's first film and prime-time television contract talks since taking over the powerful labor group that represents about 120,000 actors.

    Rosenberg, who plays lawyers on television shows like "L.A. Law" and is married to "CSI" star Marg Helgenberger, spoke to Reuters on Tuesday night just after the studios broke off those negotiations and accused the union of unreasonable demands, stoking fears of further labor unrest.

    Q: How would you characterize what happened at the bargaining table?

    A: "It was ... our intention to carry these negotiations through to their conclusion, and I felt we were making progress, and I believe this interruption will make it more difficult to reach an agreement, although I'm still optimistic."

    Q: You say there are one or two issues in the recent contract deals with writers and directors that are particular sticking points for your members. What are those?

    A: "The unfettered use of clips from motion pictures and television shows is a real problem ... . They (studios) want to be able to take clips from raw product and use it whenever they want on the Internet without getting our consent and without compensating us very much. ... Writers and directors don't have those concerns.

    "We have rules in our existing agreements that protect the images of our members. (The studios) have to get consent on everything, to use our images, to use clips, and we get compensated. ... So what they're asking us to do is erase 50 years of our custom and practice. ... They contend that new media is a whole new ballgame, and they have to make a whole new paradigm. I believe new media makes it all that much more important to protect our members."

    Q: Explain the problem actors have with provisions in the writers' and directors' deals that exempt studios from paying residuals on original made-for-Internet shows that fall below certain production costs -- $15,000 per minute, $300,000 per program or $500,000 per series, whichever is lowest:

    A: "We already have over 400 (independent) deals in new media, and almost all of those deals fall below those thresholds. Our members want to work in that arena. The way writers and directors have set it up, by virtue of their deals, is that we would have union actors potentially working on the same set with nonunion actors, which violates our most important rule, Rule One."

    Q: The increasing use of product placement in traditional media also has surfaced as a stumbling block for actors in these talks, is that right?

    A: "They say I can walk onto a TV set or a movie set without being informed, I could be handed a line of dialogue or an entire scene extolling the virtues of a product that may or may not be offensive to me, and I have no choice in the matter. That's another issue I have a big problem with."

    Q: Does the break-off in negotiations make the potential for a strike a greater possibility than it was before?

    A: "I really don't want to go there. I don't even want to entertain the thought of a strike at this moment. It's something I've always said was on the table. It's the one weapon a labor union has when they reach impasse. ... But I don't even want to think about, or talk about a strike until I'm convinced that we can't make progress in negotiations. I'm not at that point yet."

    (Reporting by Steve Gorman; Editing by Bob Tourtellotte and Xavier Briand)
     
  14. Jacquie

    Jacquie Ward Girl Moderator

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    Shane thanks for the report. We can only cross our fingers and hope both sides get back to the table soon. Although I'm not a lover of unions some of the demands the actors are making do make sense. Particularly the product placement one. I sure as heck wouldn't want to have to comment on a product if it's something I don't believe in or like. And yes I'm sure some will say the salaries but since I don't follow what the actors get paid for this and that I'm not able to comment on that.
     
  15. LibertyBell

    LibertyBell Police Officer

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    Re: Directors/Writers/SAG Contracts & The Effects

    This strike is looking more and more like a real possibility. Damn.

    I do have to agree, the product placement one needs to be decided in the SAG's favour (save that stuff for commercials please), but their main issue is not getting paid for the stuff that goes on Youtube and whatnot, which is bascially the same thing as what the writers were fighting over, yes?? Wow, I never thought I'd say this, but if that's the case then I might have to side with the strikers this time around. If the studios JUST made that same deal with the writers, why the hell would they think they could succeed in holding out on the actors? There is no freaking way. If anything, agreeing to it with the writers makes it HARDER for them to get their way with the actors because they already gave in once.

    Stubbornness needs to be eradicated off the planet. That's the only way we'll avoid these strikes for good.
     

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