Death Penalty? What's your opinion?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by CSI3, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. BabaOReilly

    BabaOReilly Head of the Swing Shift Premium Member

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    VManso , while your opinion is valued here (and I mean that- we need more men on the board! :eek: ) I think that last bit might have been a bit insensitive. I think the poster who's against the death penalty, and especially for that drug dealing guy in Singapore, that post is more than a little offensive.

    Let's try to stick to just arguing the valid points for both sides of the argument here, OK? It's a great discussion, and I'm enjoying reading something a little meatier on the old Talk CSI board.

    Thanks. :)
     
  2. VManso

    VManso CSI Level Two

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    Sorry, BabaOReilly! Just trying to point out that the nation
    of Singapore has excedingly strict laws. I remember one case, not too long ago, of an American boy who was visiting
    their country but decided to ignore their laws . You see, the people of Singapore have an extremely strict policy against spraying graffiti anywhere. Didn't mean to frighten anybody! :( And Australia was , indeed, a penal colony within the last century. That's where the Brits sent all their black sheep.
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I have heard of the Bernardo/Holmoka case, and yes I do agree with you that she does not deserve freedom. Wasn't one of those killed her own little sister?

    What heartgram meant (or what I interpreted it as- sorry if I got it wrong) is that there are probably more cases MUCH worse that should, in other people's opinions, get the death penalty. There are worse things going on.

    [/QUOTE]

    I feel very offended that you don't think I can understand heartgram's thoughts here. I do understand, I just don't agree with her later comments, or the fact that she believes that this drug dealer was an innocent, yet the people he sells his poison to are worthless and deserve to die.

    I'm not stupid at all, and even if that was not what you were trying to imply, that is how I felt when you wrote that comment.

    What gets me is that the man who was killed in Singapore was bringing back drugs to her country, and therefore he was going to spread his poison to her countrymen, something she thinks is a okay, apparently, since she feels it is the drug addicts fault if they get hooked on what he is selling and if they die then it is not his fault for selling it to them.

    That's incredibly cold and rather contradictory to me. It's barbaric to put some one to death for violating the very harsh laws of the country he was caught in, yet it is not barbaric that this person was willing to sell death to people for profit in the first place?

    I'm sorry, but I don't buy into that train of thought.

    A drug dealer sells death, and a good portion of the time they sell it too children because they need to expand their sales and make money somehow, especially if the addicts OD or end up in jail.

    And apparently this genius who went to Singapore of all places to procure his drugs of choice, most likely something like heroin or coke, since Meth can be made at home, found himself in a dire situation because he got caught with the crap on him. IN SINGAPORE.

    A place where they caned that American kid for graffiti. Caning is not a light light love tap with a stick. It a pretty savage beating. I don't know about you, but I would never want to be caned. Remember they beat a kid with a stick for Graffiti, a misdemeanor here in the US. So why would anyone really be surprised that the laws in Singapore on drug trafficking are extreme?

    I'm not.

    But I still feel no sympathy for drug dealers on a whole. To me, the man executed was nothing more than filth anyway. I cannot mourn the death of someone who knowingly causes deaths of others by dealing drugs, ruins the lives of whole families, all for a profit. I don't mourn for him anymore than I would a cockroach that I stepped on.

    Call me cold, so be it.

    I'm not on drugs, and never have been, I've never harned anyone intentionally. I've worked since I got out of school. I'm an average, law abiding American citizen with an opinion.

    Your mileage may vary.
     
  4. brassfan24

    brassfan24 Pathologist

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    I live in Canada and we don't have the death penalty here. But if we did, or I lived in the States either one, I'd be 100% for it.

    I think we should have the death penalty in Canada because that's what Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka should have got. I was 12 years old and living in Ontario when they abducted and tortured Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy. I think it's absolutely dispicable what they did and their punishments were too leanient (sp?). I mean Karla Homolka is out of prison now when she should be still rotting there. I say that because we don't have the death penalty.
    But if it's ever brought to Canada I'd support it 110%.
     
  5. BabaOReilly

    BabaOReilly Head of the Swing Shift Premium Member

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    Eibhlin , yes- one of the Bernardo/Homolka victims was Karla's own sister.

    She made a deal to give Bernardo up and get leniency in her own sentence. And then after the "deal with the devil" was made, they came across some video evidence that proved that Karla was not the frightened wife manipulated by her terrifying and sick husband, but rather an active and willing participant. Unfortunately, the deal had been made already. There's no way she should be out now. NO way.
     
  6. madgeorge

    madgeorge Coroner

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    She gave her sister to Paul as a "surprise gift". And now she's out in the general public. Geez.
     
  7. VManso

    VManso CSI Level Two

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    The people of Singapore have zero toleration for persons who mess up their tiny country. It all goes back to their higher standard of living. Not a single sidewalk is written upon!
     
  8. Palm

    Palm Coroner

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    It's because she made a deal with the attorney that she stated that she had no part, that she wasn't a willing participant and put the blame on Paul, even though now about everyone knows that is untrue. She should still be locked up in that jail.
    What's really getting to me is that director who made the movie about them and is trying to show it in Canada. His movie basically, as the rumors state, that Karla was victimized and basically a modern-day heroine for women in an abusive relationship. And although that is completely wrong, he is lobbying to try and get it up into theaters in Canada.
    I don't think it's occured to him that Canadians don't want to watch a movie sympathizing with a killer. Or, for the fact, relive that whole ordeal. It's insane. I'd be like a Canadian director making a movie about Son of Sam and trying to get everyone in New York to watch it. The logic isn't present.
    But I could be wrong...
     
  9. VManso

    VManso CSI Level Two

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    There is no "ifs", "ands" or "buts" about it. Karla is a monster who should have been locked and bound with the key thrown away for good measure. I f the psychiartrists couldn't see through her , then their profession is due for a serious revamping.
     
  10. Missing

    Missing Pathologist

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    Yeah maybe the homeless should commit crimes to get food and housing and healthcare.
     
  11. VManso

    VManso CSI Level Two

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    Actually, it has its root in this democratic system under which we live."We" vote for the legislators who make these laws... get my drift??
     
  12. tinyspark

    tinyspark Lab Technician

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    Ah, Singapore, I've never been, but some friends have been. Apparently, they tell you that the penalty for drug possession is death. AT THE AIRPORT. As in, when you get off the plane. If you get nailed over there, you're screwed. Nobody from the Embassy of whatever country you're from will be coming to bail your ass out.

    Eibhlin, your point about drug dealers peddling death was very interesting and was something I hadn't even considered. I guess it all comes down to an eye for an eye, once again.

    My mother really, really surprised me when Jeffrey Dahmer was beaten to death in prison. She said she felt deeply sorry for him, that she believed that he was an extremely sick man who honestly couldn't control his actions. I was floored by her empathy because it was something I didn't have it in me to feel that for him.
     
  13. Palm

    Palm Coroner

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    ^ I do admit, Jeffrey Dahmer was... yikes. Not exactly my favourite Serial story to tell but hearing how your mother felt such empathy towards him is really eye-opening. I mean, it made me shift my perspective on how some people view killers and the fact that there is a person out there that feels sympathy makes me believe in humanitarism again.
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The death penalty shouldn't be used on anyone.

    I'm glad it's not in use here.
     
  15. VManso

    VManso CSI Level Two

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    Detective,
    You can only speak for the country in which you were born.


    Come for the hors-d'oeuvres, stay for the interrogation -Grissom
     

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